Can you trace the Kings of Judah to the Babylonian Captivity?

Yes.

We can chart the dates based upon the numbers of years each king reigned and the dates that we found in our last question regarding the time from the Exodus to the dividing of the tribes of Judah from the tribes of Israel. That starting date was 975 BC, calculated chronologically from the Exodus in 1491 BC (see How do you reconcile the years in Acts 13:18-22 with 1 Ki 6:1?).

Here is the table giving you the references from 2 Chronicles for each king’s reign and the corresponding dates that he would have reigned based upon the length of his reign.

Reference King Years Reigned Dates
2 Chr 12:13 Rehoboam

17

975-958

2 Chr 13:2 Abijah

3

958-955

2 Chr 16:13 Asa

41

955-914

2 Chr 20:31 Jehoshaphat

25

914-889

2 Chr 21:20 Jehoram

8

895-887*

2 Chr 22:2 Ahaziah

1

887-886

2 Chr 22:12, 23:1 Athaliah

7

886-879

2 Chr 24:1 Joash

40

879-839

2 Chr 25:1 Amaziah

29

839-810

2 Chr 26:3 Uzziah

52

810-758

2 Chr 27:1 Jotham

16

758-742

2 Chr 28:1 Ahaz

16

742-726

2 Chr 29:1 Hezekiah

29

726-697

2 Chr 33:1 Manasseh

55

697-642

2 Chr 33:21 Amon

2

642-640

2 Chr 34:1 Josiah

31

640-609

2 Chr 36:2 Jehoahaz

3 mos.

609-609

2 Chr 36:5 Jehoiakim

11

609-598

2 Chr 36:9 Jehoiachin

3 mos. 10 days

598-597

2 Chr 36:11 Zedekiah

11

597-586

 

* During the last six or seven years of Jehoshaphat’s reign, Jehoram would have ruled over Judah — notice that Jehoshaphat was called the “king of Israel” in 2 Chr 21:2, making him king over both Judah and Israel at the same time. This occurred after Ahab died in 895. Ahab’s son, Jehoram, took over the ten northern tribes of Israel (2 Ki 3:1), and Jehoshaphat’s son, also named Jehoram, took over the two southern tribes of Judah, while Jehoshaphat co-reigned over both kingdoms. This is why there is an overlap in Jehoram’s reign in Judah with Jehoshaphat and why Jehoshaphat had the title “king of Israel,” when he died.